Sunday, September 23, 2018

CFP The Evolution of Evil in Fantasy and Science Fiction, Academia Lunare (11/30/2018)

Here's an interesting call:

The Evolution of Evil in Fantasy and Science Fiction, Academia Lunare
https://www.fantastic-arts.org/2018/the-evolution-of-evil-in-fantasy-and-science-fiction-academia-lunare/
July 9, 2018

Academia Lunare

Academia Lunare is the Luna Press Publishing academic branch for Fantasy and Science Fiction.

One of the most exciting aspects of fandom is the critical assessment of literature, as a way to show one’s love for a particular author or body of work. Speculative non-fiction is also a mirror for society, with an eye cast into the future.

The Evolution of Evil in Fantasy and Science Fiction

We are very proud to announce our third Call For Papers. The theme of the 2018 CfPs is: “The Evolution of Evil in Fantasy and Science Fiction”.

Our first call for papers, “Gender and Sexuality in Fantasy and Science Fiction” received 2 BSFA Awards nomination and one BSFA Awards shortlist. The second call for papers, “The Evolution of African Fantasy and Science Fiction”, will be out this summer.

It is time for a new challenge!

Writers are invited to explore the concept of evil in all its shapes and developments, in literature, games, movies and TV.

Here is some food for thought, though it should not restrict your own ideas:

  • ​Focus on a specific character which has embodied the concept of evil
  • The development of a specific archetypal character which, over the course of the centuries, has undergone a transformation from neutral/positive figure into an evil one, or vice versa – historical and socio-political influences that brought about this transformation
  • Development of a representative type of evil over time (trolls, fairies, mad gods, dark lords, vampires, demons, etc.)
  • The impact of religion on folklore
  • Latest incarnations of evil mirroring socio-political changes
  • Latest incarnations of evil in general
  • Evil as an embodiment of modern society
  • Evolution of evil through the ages
  • Possible representations of minorities as evil
  • Creating evil – what makes a successful villain?
  • Heroes as villains
  • Other representations of evil, e.g. hostile environments. Music as a tool for implying threat and hostility


Before you start, get in touch! Send us an email either with your abstract or simply to let us know what topic you intend to explore: it is perfectly fine to have more than one author discussing the same topic, as long as the angle is different.

Word Limit: up to 6,000 words.

Full references for citations must be included using Harvard referencing style. Download the full guide and the quick guide on the Academia Lunare page.

Closing Date: 30th of November 2018.

Publishing contract for all participants, with shared royalties from each sale and a free copy of the book.

Do not fear if this is your first non-fiction work: if you love research, you need a chance to start somewhere. Take a look at the past two Call For Papers blog posts and explore the articles submitted – it may help you decide your course of action.

For more information, please see https://www.lunapresspublishing.com/academialunare. FacebookTwitterGoogle+

Sunday, June 24, 2018

CFP To Prove a Villain: On the Performativity of “Evil” Characters in Anglophone Literature Collection (7/30/2018)

An interesting idea:

To Prove a Villain: On the Performativity of “Evil” Characters in Anglophone Literature
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2018/05/25/to-prove-a-villain-on-the-performativity-of-%E2%80%9Cevil%E2%80%9D-characters-in-anglophone

deadline for submissions: July 30, 2018

full name / name of organization: University of Gafsa, Tunisia

contact email: villainycollection@gmail.com


Why, I can smile, and murder whiles I smile,
And cry 'Content' to that which grieves my heart,
And wet my cheeks with artificial tears,
And frame my face to all occasions.
I'll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall;
I'll slay more gazers than the basilisk;
I'll play the orator as well as Nestor,
Deceive more slily than Ulysses could,
And, like a Sinon, take another Troy.
I can add colours to the chameleon,
Change shapes with Proteus for advantages,
And set the murderous Machiavel to school.

(Henry VI Part III, 3.2)

The emphasis on “the performativity of texts” (Skinner x) has now become common in literary studies. “The notion of literature as performative” (Culler 96) is now entrenched. It pervades many of the recent studies of the theory of literature. This is why the concept of performance is no longer confined to literary forms that are traditionally written to be performed on the stage, the pulpit or the podium, like drama, songs and sermons. Every form of literature can be considered as performative. Moreover, the works of Judith Butler, Quentin Skinner, Richard Schechner, Jonathan Culler, Jacques Derrida, Richard Rorty and others have shown that performativity characterizes all the aspects of literature. The writing, marketing, reading and analysis of literature are performative. It is quite common to describe them as acts, esp. the act of reading. This performativity extends the concept of literature irrevocably beyond the boundaries of the written text. It also proves that we need to cope with the looseness of the term literature that can no longer be confined to the classical genres. Many traditional and new (non)-discursive practices started to fall into the category of literature, from which they have long been excluded. Probably the most intriguingly appealing characters in traditional and contemporary literature, the representations of evil characters – be they villains in drama, antagonists in fiction and cinema, bosses in video games or corrupt public figures in satirical writings – has always been connected with the notion of performance. Evil characters, real or/and fictional, are – for the most part – defined by their deeds. This is why the notion of performance can be quite helpful in understanding them. To further contribute to the articulation of this interconnection between performativity and the literary representation of evil characters, we are seeking detailed proposals for a collection of academic essays entitled:

To Prove a Villain: On the Performativity of “Evil” Characters in Anglophone Literature

The proposals may address one or more of the following topics or other relevant topics within the scope of the literature written (conceived, developed, created, etc.) in English:

- Villains and villainy in literature

- Characterization of the evil characters

- Representations of crimes and evil deeds in literary discourses

- The role of evil characters in shaping the plot

- Villains and evil doers in mythology and religious literature

- The secular villain

- Magic, sorcery and devilish arts

- Technology and evil

- Evil characters in science fiction

- Evil in performance studies

- Visibility and invisibility in evil characters

- Temptation, seduction and the “virality” of evil

- Evil characters in children literature

- Ethnicity, gender, sexuality, difference and the evil character

- The (post)colonial villain

- Eroticizing evil (characters)

- Evil characters in Gothic literature

- Vampires, undead and other creatures as evil characters

- Dystopia, tyranny, ideology and “evil” leadership

- Satire

- Spectacular evil

- Graphic depiction of evil characters in visual literature

- The cult of literary villains (e.g. Dracula)

- Rehabilitation of literary and historical villains

- Physical portrayal of evil characters

- Evil characters in their own words (soliloquies, autobiographies, dialogues, etc.)

- Adaptations of literary works


Please send your proposals along with a short bio as Word attachments to the following email: villainycollection@gmail.com by July 30th, 2018

This email only accepts formal proposals

For queries and for further information please contact Dr. Nizar Zouidi (University of Gafsa, Tunisia): nizarzouidinizar@outlook.com


The chapters should be from 5000 to 8000 words in length and should be formatted according to the guidelines that will be provided after the abstracts are accepted by the peer reviewers. Upon completion, the chapters will be peer reviewed again and proofread by the committee in order to ensure their compliance with the publisher’s requirements. However, no change shall be made without the explicit consent of the authors.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

CFP Villains In Medieval And Early Modern Life And Lit (7/2/2018)

Finally, a call of relevance to post:


deadline for submissions: 
July 2, 2018
full name / name of organization: 
Center for Medieval-Renaissance Studies, the University of Virginia’s College at Wise
contact email: 
This panel of the 32nd Medieval-Renaissance Conference (UVA-Wise, Sept. 13-15, 2018) invites papers on medieval and early modern villains and the dynamic ethical codes assigned them by authors, audiences, and critics. By villains we mean criminals, tricksters (such as professional beggers), political careerists, or poets and their characters, charismatic or not. Some viable threads: villains as likable (anti-)heroes; villains as reflections of med-ren political and social audiences; the vices, virtues, and skills of villains; the ethical implications their very existence conjures. Submit abstracts to Sherif Abdelkarim at sa2je@virginia.edu. Deadline July 2, 2018.

Last updated March 27, 2018
 

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Arthurian Villains at Arthurian Congress 2014

Of interest if you're in Romania this summer:

XXIV Triennial Congress of the International Arthurian Society - University of Bucharest
(full program at http://arthuriancongress.unibuc.ro/programme/)


Monday, 21 July

Panel 2 : 15.20-17.00
Women and Magic
Paper 4 (of 4): Carlos SANZ MINGO (Cardiff University), Other Worlds, other Cultures : Morgan in Spanish Arthurian Literature


Tuesday, 22 July

Panel 3: 11.50-13.00
Lectures des sources arthuriennes
Paper 1 (of 3): Yuri FUWA (Keio University), Sir Mordred the Malebranche — a possible source for the Alliterative Morte Arthure and its thematic significance


Friday, 25 July

Panel 1: 15.20-17.20
Thematic Pannel : Children of the (K)night: Arthurian Bad Boys and Mean Girls
Organizer : Kevin J. HARTY (La Salle University, Philadelphia)
Participants:
Christine NEUFELD (Eastern Michigan University), Bloodlines: The Sanguine Semiotics of Dracula vs. King Arthur
Susan ARONSTEIN (University of Wyoming), Thoroughly Modern Morgan?: Starz’ Camelot’s Arthurian Bad Girl
Martin B. SHICHTMAN (Eastern Michigan University), Subversive Sorority: The Naughty Nuns of Starz’ Camelot
Elizabeth S. SKLAR (Wayne State University), Queering Mordred
Donald L. HOFFMAN (Northeastern Illinois University), The Queering of Mordred Revisited
Kevin J. HARTY (La Salle University), Using the Arthurian Legend to Turn Bad Boys into Good Boys: The Boy Scouts and Thomas Edison Make an Arthurian Film, The Knights of the Square Table
Laurie A. FINKE (Kenyon College), Ghosts of Chivalry: King Arthur and the Ku Klux Klan

Monday, September 9, 2013

CFP Neo-Victorian Villain collecttion (9/15/13)

Proposals on villains are generally rare, so I thought I'd share this to readers (though, I confess, I would be a stretch to connect in directly to Arthurian villains).


[UPDATE] Deadline extended for 'Neo-Victorian Villains' edited volume


full name / name of organization: 
Benjamin Poore, University of York, UK
contact email: 

The deadline for chapter proposals for this edited collection has been extended to September 15th. There has been a very strong response so far, but there are still some areas mentioned in the CFP (reproduced below) that I would very much like to see proposals on, to help address the full range of the subject and different approaches to neo-Victorianism.

As before, potential contributors are invited to submit a 250-word abstract for consideration, along with a biographical note of 50 to 100 words, to:

Dr Benjamin Poore (Department of Theatre, Film and Television, University of York) at benjamin.poore@york.ac.uk

Neo-Victorian Villains: Neo-Victorian Fiction, Adaptation and Performance

The collection will provide an innovative and wide-ranging exploration of the afterlives of the Victorian villain, in fiction, and stage and screen performance.

Subjects covered may include, but are not limited to:

  • Direct transmedia adaptations - from nineteenth-century classic fiction and neo-Victorian novels, to stage, screen, console and graphic novel. 
  •  Intertextuality – including allusion, pastiche and crossover fiction and film.
  • Genealogies of villainy from the nineteenth century to the present day – investigating the development of such figures and types as the supervillain, the master of disguise, the adventuress, the mesmerist, the femme fatale, and the split-personality. 
  • The afterlives of specific Victorian villains in modern culture, for example: Augustus Melmotte, Michael Henchard, Count Fosco, Sweeney Todd, Svengali, Dracula, Edward Hyde, Hawley Griffin, Dorian Gray, Professor Moriarty, Jack the Ripper, Lucy Graham, Helen Vaughan, Lydia Gwilt.
  • Processes of production, from the commissioning, filming and design of Victorian and neo-Victorian screen adaptations, to actors’ processes and approaches to their roles, as well as those of playwrights and screenwriters.

CFP Evil Incarnate Conference (1/1/14)

Cross-posted from Popular Preternaturaliana:

Evil Incarnate: Manifestations of Villains and Villainy


full name / name of organization: 
Case Western Reserve University and Crime Studies Network
contact email: 

Evil Incarnate: Manifestations of Villains and Villainy
11-13 July 2014
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Prof. David Frankfurter (Religious Studies, Boston University); Prof. Ronald Holmes (Justice Administration, University of Louisville); Prof. William Paul (Film Studies, Washington University in St. Louis)

The concept of villainy is a universal: the dichotomy of good versus evil has been a central conflict underlying ideologies and praxis across cultures and time. What, after all, is a hero without the villain as a foil? This conference asks: what defines villainy? Is it moral? Cultural? Inherent or the product of circumstance? How are villains represented textually, culturally, and politically? What does the presence of the villain do to the issues in which they are embedded? How would the issues change in their absence? By exploring the concept of villainy as it manifests itself, we want to explore the various permutations of villainy and their consequences.

Ultimately, we seek definition for villains in an attempt to overturn the characterizing of this pursuit as “[T]he motive-hunting of a motiveless malignity,” because, unfortunately, the designation of evil incarnate is also that of villainy beyond understanding (S. T. Coleridge). Instead, this conference asks whether W.H. Auden provided a more accurate depiction in his assertion that “evil is unspectacular and always human.” We hope that by coming to terms with villains and villainy, we can better understand the meaning of a hero’s victory.
We are interested in papers from a variety of disciplinary and inter-disciplinary perspectives.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

• Villains and crime in literature and /or fiction

• Villains and monsters in the media/ media constructions of villainy

• Moral transgression, evil, and villainy

• The making of national enemies

• Evil and history

• Evil as a necessity

• Monsters Across Cultures

• What Causes Evil

• Aliens and alienation

• Supernatural Evil and the Occult

• Political villains such as Dictators,Tyrants, Fascists, and/or Nazis

• Terrorists

• Criminality in Society

• Holocausts

Please send 300-word abstracts words for papers of 20 minutes to evilincarnate_at_case.edu by January 1, 2014. The abstract should also include a 50-word biographical note and AV requests. Please indicate if you wish the abstract to be considered for inclusion in the post-conference publications. We will send acceptances by February 28, 2014.

Conference Organizers: Drs. Malcah Effron and Brian Johnson (English, Case Western Reserve University)
Conference Sponsors: CWRU Department of English and the Crime Studies Network
Contact Details: evilincarnate_at_case.edu
Abstract Deadline: 1 January 2014


Sunday, August 18, 2013

Alliance/Blog Update August 2013

Effective August 2013, the Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Villains of the Matter of Britain has been absorbed by the revived Society for Arthurian Popular Culture Studies (founded 2000) and the resulting organization named The Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Matter of Britain. The new group will function for the remainder of 2013 as an affiliate of The Virtual Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages and be based at the King Arthur Forever website at KingArthurForever.org. This site will be maintained as time permits.

Further details can be found on King Arthur Forever at http://kingarthurforever.blogspot.com/2013/08/king-arhur-forever-reborn.html.

Michael A. Torregrossa
Co-Founder, The Virtual Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages
Founder, The Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Matter of Britain

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Our Kalamazoo Sessions 2013

Time and technology continue to conspire against me, but here (at last) are the details of our sessions. The complete program can be accessed at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/sessions.html.

Saturday, 11 May 2013 at 12:00 PM
Valley III 303
Business Meeting and Reception: Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Villains of the Matter of Britain; Institute for the Advancement of Scholarship on the Magic-Wielding Figures of Visual Electronic Multimedia; Virtual Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

All are welcome to attend to discuss and plan sessions for 2014 and 2015.


Saturday, 11 May 2013 at 1:30 PM
Session 422, Fetzer 1005
Arthurian Monster Quest: Investigating the Monsters of the Arthurian Tradition (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Villains of the Matter of Britain

Organizer: Michael A. Torregrossa, Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Villains of the Matter of Britain
Presider: Charlotte A. T. Wulf, Stevenson Univ.

Ysbaddaden Pencawr: A Gentler Giant?
Lisa LeBlanc, Anna Maria College

The Giant of Mont-Saint-Michel: Grendelkin?
Kris Kobold, York Univ.

Monstrous Felines in Old French Arthuriana, or, There’s More Than One Way to Skin a Chapalu
Brandy N. Brown, Pennsylvania State Univ.

Lycanthropy and Absence in Arthur and Gorlagon
Angela Tenga, Florida Institute of Technology

“An Unsemely Sighte”: Medieval Arthurian Women as Monstrosities
S. Elizabeth Passmore, Univ. of Southern Indiana


=============================
Michael A. Torregrossa, MA
Founder, The Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Villains of the Matter of Britain
http://ArthurianVillainyResearch.blogspot.com/

Other Links:
The Monstrous Matter of Britain

Monday, October 15, 2012

Arthurian Monster Quest Update

I am pleased to announce the details of our sponsored session for next year's Medieval Congress:


Arthurian Monster Quest: Investigating the Monsters of the Arthurian Tradition (Roundtable)
Organizer: Michael A. Torregrossa, The Alliance for the Promotion of Research on the Villains of the Matter of Britain

Presider: Charlotte A. T. Wulf, Stevenson University

Paper 1: Ysbaddaden Pencawr: A Gentler Giant?
Lisa LeBlanc, Anna Maria College

Paper 2: The Giant of Mont-Saint-Michel: Grendelkin?
Kris Kobold, York University

Paper 3: Monstrous Felines in Old French Arthuriana, or There’s More Than One Way to Skin a Chapalu
Brandy N. Brown, The Pennsylvania State University


Paper 4: Lycanthropy and Absence in Arthur and Gorlagon
Angela Tenga, Florida Institute of Technology


Paper 5: “An Unsemely Sighte”: Medieval Arthurian Women as Monstrosities
S. Elizabeth Passmore, University of Southern Indiana



Friday, September 28, 2012

Kalamazoo Update

My apologies for the delaying in updating the site(s) and focusing on the Kalamazoo session on monsters. I have been thinking and reading much on monsters but (unfortunately) not doing much thinking about Kalamazoo these past few months.

Expect an update on the session by Monday and email responses to all proposals submitted to the Alliance address by tonight.

Michael Torregrossa